Bored

Discussion in 'Poetry & Literature' started by babeboichan, Sep 20, 2014.

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    babeboichan

    babeboichan Commoner

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    Flying free across the pages,
    floating gently over the keyboard,
    letting go,
    dancing to the unharmonized music,
    allowing the mind to wander
    to whatever it's supposed to wander to
    whenever it's supposed to wander.

    Sometimes it's okay to be bored,
    immersing yourself in
    simply living,
    simply being.

    Because when you're bored,
    you're most interested,
    most invested
    in life.

    What to do to quench
    this overwhelming urge
    to do something?
    To be productive?
    To live?

    It's okay to be bored,
    because the moment
    that you allow your mind
    to wander past the barriers of
    conformity, unity, and comfortable routine,
    is when you're the most creative,
    the most productive,
    the most free.

    The most intriguing state of being
    should be that of being bored,
    for it's a feeling that cannot be
    quantified, described, or
    most of all
    bound and bottled to be
    shared with others.

    It simply is.
     
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    thahappycamper

    thahappycamper Level 3

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    masterpiece (y)
    I bet you write 16 bars too
     
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    thahappycamper

    thahappycamper Level 3

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    The Lonesome Poet,
    Walking along the Beach,
    His dog following along,
    Each focusing on the vast expanse of water,
    The air, thick, foggy, wet
    A sense of peace and oneness,
    Time sit still in the morning cold,
    Nothing to hear but the waves and seagulls,
    The boat engines rumbles,
    Joggers, pacing in straight lines,
    Clear Skies

     
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    thahappycamper

    thahappycamper Level 3

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    The Lonesome Poet,
    Immerse in his Thoughts,
    Introverted,
    His Eyes, Keen, Staring Out,
    Hoping, Wishing, Dreaming,
    Scenes from his Vivid Past,
    Trudging on a Path, Unknown
    Far Ahead on this New Path,
    New Beginnings​
     
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    babeboichan

    babeboichan Commoner

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    i like
     
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    thahappycamper

    thahappycamper Level 3

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    @babeboichan

    Thanks bruh. I tried to learn and use imagery in my poems.
    http://www.poetryarchive.org/glossary/imagery

    Imagery is the name given to the elements in a poem that spark off the senses. Despite "image" being a synonym for "picture", images need not be only visual; any of the five senses (sight, hearing, touch, taste, smell) can respond to what a poet writes. Examples of non-visual imagery can be found in Ken Smith's 'In Praise of Vodka', where he describes the drink as having "the taste of air, of wind on fields, / the wind through the long wet forest", and James Berry's 'Seashell', which puts the "ocean sighs" right in a listener's ear.

    A poet could simply state, say, "I see a tree", but it is possible to conjure up much more specific images using techniques such as simile ("a tree like a spiky rocket"), metaphor ("a green cloud riding a pole") or synechdoche ("bare, black branches") - each of these suggests a different kind of tree. Techniques, such as these, that can be used to create powerful images are called figurative language, and can also include onomatopoeia, metonymy and personification.

    One of the great pleasures of poetry is discovering a particularly powerful image; the Imagists of the early 20th century felt it was the most important aspect, so were devoted to finding strong images and presenting them in the clearest language possible. Of course, not every poem is an Imagist poem, but making images is something that nearly every poem in the Archive does.

    An interesting contrast in imagery can be found by comparing Alison Croggon's 'The Elwood Organic Fruit and Vegetable Shop' with Allen Ginsberg's 'A Supermarket in California'; although both poets seem to like the shops they write about, Ginsberg's shop is full of hard, bright things, corralled into aisles, featuring neon, tins and freezers, while the organic shop is full of images of soft, natural things rubbing against one another in sunlight. Without it being said explicitly, the imagery makes it clear that the supermarket is big, boxy, and tidy, unlike the cosy Elwood's. This is partly done with the visual images that are drawn, and in part with Croggon's images that mix the senses (this is called synaesthesia), such as the strawberries with their "klaxons of sweetness" or the gardens with "well-groomed scents", having the way the imagery is made correspond with what the imagery shows.
     
    #6 thahappycamper, Sep 21, 2014
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2014
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    Marvelous

    Marvelous Commoner

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    Amazing!
     
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    babeboichan

    babeboichan Commoner

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    thank u
     

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